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, this could eventually be worth hundreds of billions of dollars. the only energy extraction company currently produces just enough oil to stay afloat from a single existing fields in the sea. with help, things could be very different. >> we need oil and gas companies to come to greece to work together with us. we know the country. we know the geology. corporations would be very welcome to open of the parts of greece and hopefully find the big oil and gas fields that will make the difference. >> it is a tantalizing prospect. there's a pay a fortune. it could exist naturally in abundant quantities also been the country's grass. a tantalizing prospect but years away from producing any tangible benefit. >> we will have an indication following the explanation. it is off the possible positions, magnitude, constitution. >> fortunes have been made by shipping magnate on the surface of the but decade. what lies beneath could one day make the whole country rich. al jazeera, athens. >> there have been clashes between police and protesters. dozens of people were blocked from reaching the square and made
of this disease, depending on the variation of protein energy malnutrition that we see, can be as high as 30 to 50%. usually the children die from routine infections like diarrhea or pneumonia. in fact, pneumonia is the most common cause of death. children who are severely malnourished appear anorexic. they do not want to eat. they're often very depressed. their heads are low. they stop talking. they stop walking, and they're severely dehydrated and suffering from infectious diseases. perhaps the most extreme case of malnutrition the team witnessed was annis-- a tiny wisp of a girl, two and a half years old. annis is just skin and bones and a head. and i looked at her, and i looked at the weight, and i asked the mother how old she is and the mother told me. and i said, "it's not possible." so i took annis myself back to weigh. i saw the scale, it said 4.2 kilos, took annis off, measured her height, put her back on the scale. i still couldn't believe it. it was amazing to me that annis was still alive. the highest mortality for children so severely malnourished occurs in the first few days. if you
reform, gun- control, and a balancing energy production with climate concerns. but his first priority is getting congress to increase the nation's debt ceiling at that talk about cutting the debt. that's where some think he will try to cement his legacy. >> he's going to try to get our long term in thailand obligations under control and set us on a new fiscal course. >> the president's first foreign-policy priority last term was israeli-palestinian peace. it's unlikely to take the top spot the second time, where most expect the president's focus to be on iran. >> it's hard to believe if we can't get a meaningful negotiation within the next two years that you will not have it read capable of producing a nuclear weapons. then, the u.s. has the choice in its negotiations -- will the solution be containment or is it going to be a preventive strike? >> as he takes the oath again, he will do it with the experience of that presidencies are often formed by crises that happened outside of their control. he will know all folksy brought here last i did not change washington. he will try somethin
the idea how energy relates to these things. it's the knowing how hot-- how much energy is gonna flow. and we get that idea. we make these distinctions. you guys know when you go on the top of the mountains, it's cold up there. but you're closer to the sun, right? in the top of the mountains, it's cold. and somebody say, "hey, how come it's so cold up here?" so--we're closer to the sun. wait, no, no, no. that should make us hotter. you guys know when you're approaching the sun, it gets hotter and hotter, don't you? have you known that? i mean, you can get in the best ceramic materials that the humans can make. you get within a million miles of that sun. honey, you're gonna fry to a crisp, a million miles from the sun, unless you go at nighttime. [laughter] hey, but the point, back again, you're up at the top of the hill and it's cool up there. and you know what you can tell your friends? hey, gang, you know why it's so cool up here? because warm air rises. let me ask you a question, does warm air rise? you guys know about that from before? did you guys know that you get in the top of
ended -- at nuclear power for its future and nuclear energy needs. >> the corzine were the original inhabitants of southern africa. for at least 2000 years, the hunted, herded, and gathered on the land and the sea. skeletons in the sand and evidence of what and where they ate. >> maybe they ate the food out of the jars. >> the land was seized by colonialists. under apartheid, their identity was further fracturing the proposal to build a nuclear power station here is unacceptable. >> they take our land. they are ready to take our identity away from us. everything we have got, they take away from us. now what is left for us is only -- >> these artifacts were all collected here. she and her husband, a traditional healer, are trying to preserve a culture they say is not respected. they do not have former first reform of first nation indigenous that as yet. -- they do not have formal first nation indigenous status yet. >> it is not for them to say this community is right, this community is wrong. >> nuclear power now only meets 6% of south africa's needs. by 2030 the government wants it
harnessing all other kinds of energy. during that long block of time from a couple of million years ago until the industrial revolution, there was a point about 10,000 years ago when human beings began to farm, began to practice agriculture, and that harnessed a lot more energy than was possible by just hunting and gathering wild resources. keach: in the old world, we know that agriculture sparked the development of the world's first cities in places like sumer in ancient mesopotamia. but how did farming begin in the new world ? when scotty macneish first came to the tehuacan valley in 1962, he was seeking the answer to one simple question -- did agriculture evolve here or was it introduced from the old world ? then we'll measure out from the corners. keach: in a stratum of the purron cave that had been laid down thousands of years later than those in which he found the hunters and gatherers, macneish made a discovery that exceeded all expectations. macneish: this is a corn cob, and it's a real little one. keach: it may have looked insignificant, but the shriveled ear dated to about 5000 b.c.
hope for american energy independence. then along came 1979. revolutionary shock waves spread through islamic nations. iran cut off petroleum exports to the united states. america felt it was held hostage by dependence on foreign oil. as the price of a gallon of gas passed a dollar, congress debated closing off 100 million alaskan acres to mineral exploitation. the bill would double our national park system. alaska congressman don young was outraged. how selfish and ridiculous can we be when we think we can live within ourselves? we have billions of people in asia alone, south america is suffering from starvation, and we're going to set aside 175 million acres of land for a playground that has all the minerals and oil and resources-- timber and hydropower? that's asinine! other congressmen saw the issue in more personal terms. arizona congressman mo udall. the most important thing to me is that it's there. you get a real lift from getting out of the artificial world and being with nature. not only oil lay beneath the tundra. minerals vital to national defense were being imported from
job! children need to run, and they need to work off that energy. but along with that, we provide challenges for them. for instance, i would hope in an appropriate preschool you would always see a climber... and a climber having stairs, a climber having maybe a chain that they will have to problem solve and figure out how to move on that. so even though they are running off energy, they're also outside problem-solving, figuring out ways to move their bodies on different objects to promote that development. hendrick: vigorous play is the breath of life to children. our young people need to climb... crawl... run... balance... and hang from equipment. what would you do? how would you use your environment? what sorts of activities and equipment would you suggest that would help your children maximize their playtime? we have...sometimes we involve dancing in our lesson plans. we have things like the balance beam out, and that stimulates their coordination and their sense of balance. um...even going outside and running. so far, we have looked at how to provide an appropriate and safe en
other sub budgets and a permanent energy. domestically, we have a much higher unemployment rate in 1968. we have more poverty absolutely and relatively and 1968. we certainly have more home foreclosures and more consumer debt. of course, 30 million workers are making today less than the workers made in 1968 adjusted for inflation. that is why we're launching this national drive to overpower congress and split the republicans in congress, organized and what the democrats, so tens of billions of dollars are poured into the community, into the long deserved pockets of these people, many of whom have children and they don't have health insurance or paid sick leave or big vacations. but they deserve $10.50 minimum wage, which is what it would be in 1968. no big deal. >> explain how that would work, how does an increase in the minimum wage actually work? >> 1, congress can pass it for all of the states. there is no competition between the states that way in terms of wage levels, no competition between businesses, etc. everyone would have to pay the same minimum wage. the other way is what has
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9